The Podcast for Social Research, Episode 22: Seeing Red–On the Centenary of the Russian Revolution

In the twenty-second episode of the Podcast for Social Research, Asma Abbas, Tony Alessandrini, Ajay Singh Chaudhary, and Rebecca Ariel Porte commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the Russian Revolution with a conversation about its material legacy in text, music, visual art, film, architecture and technology. Panelists ask what the revolution was, why it happened, how it played out in political theory and in practice. Their conversation considers what the revolution meant in its own moment and what it means today in light of attempts to conceive different and better forms of life. Due to technical difficulties, the first part of the episode recreates a conversation originally recorded live at 61 Local; the second part of the episode, which departs from the question of to what degree we’ve forgotten the forms and effects of the revolution and to what degree they’re still with us, preserves the panel discussion from the original event.

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Episode 22: Seeing Red--On the Centenary of the Russian Revolution

Notations

In the twenty-second episode of the Podcast for Social Research, Asma Abbas, Tony Alessandrini, Ajay Singh Chaudhary, and Rebecca Ariel Porte commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the Russian Revolution with a conversation about its material legacy in text, music, visual art, film, architecture and technology. Panelists ask what the revolution was, why it happened, how it played out in political theory and in practice. Their conversation considers what the revolution meant in its own moment and what it means today in light of attempts to conceive different and better forms of life. Due to technical difficulties, the first part of the episode recreates a conversation originally recorded live at 61 Local; the second part of the episode preserves the panel discussion from the original event.

Cover of the Portfolio for the Congress of Committees on Rural Poverty (1918)

 

Propaganda image of Lenin and Stalin

 

Advertising poster for beer (1925), Alexander Rodchenko

 

Bus stop, Gagra, Abkhazia, Zurab Tsereteli

 

Model for the Monument to the Third International (1919 – 1920), Vladimir Tatlin

 

Design for the Monument to the Third International (1919 – 1920), Vladimir Tatlin

 

 

Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge (1919), El Lissitzky

 

Poster: “Books,” with Lilya Brik (1924), Alexander Rodchenko and Varvara Stepanova

 

Spanish Civil War-era Poster: “For a republic that advances the liberation of women”

 

Album Cover: You Could Have It So Much Better (2005), Rich Costey and Franz Ferdinand

 

Photoshopped image in support of Hillary Clinton (2016)

 

Egypt Will Rise (2011), Nick Bygon

 

MoMA Reproduction: Suprematist Tea Set (original designed by Nikolai Suetin; 1923)

 

Black Square (1915), Kazimir Malevich

 

Unisex Sportswear Designs (1928), Varvara Stepanova

 

Textile Designs (1920s), Varvara Stepanova

 

Box for “Our Industry” Caramels (1923), Vladimir Mayakovsky and Alexander Rodchenko

 

Model Worker’s Club (1925), Alexander Rodchenko